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If you regularly have trouble sleeping, it might be a good idea to have a word with your doctor about it. If you do decide to make an appointment with your GP, it’s important that you should be able to give them all the information they need to make an accurate diagnosis. Below is a list of 15 questions that you should answer as accurately as possible before you see your doctor. Note down your answers and take them with you, to ensure your GP gives you all the help you need.

  1. Do you regularly have difficulty falling or staying asleep, or do you wake early in the morning?
  2. Do you feel well rested in the morning?
  3. Do you fall asleep unintentionally or have to fight to stay awake during the day?
  4. Do your sleep difficulties or daytime sleepiness interfere with your daily activities?
  5. Do you snore loudly?
  6. Do you hold your breath, have breathing pauses, or stop breathing in your sleep?
  7. Do you have restless or “crawling” feelings in your legs at night that go away if you move?
  8. Do your legs or arms twitch repeatedly during your sleep?
  9. Do you have nightmares, or scream, walk, punch, or kick in your sleep?
  10. Is your sleep regularly disturbed by pain, physical symptoms, worries, medications, etc?
  11. Do you feel sad or anxious during the day? What is your mood like in the morning?
  12. Do you work shifts or odd hours?
  13. How do you sleep when you are away from home or on holiday?
  14. Does your work or lifestyle prevent you from getting enough sleep?
  15. Do you wake up during the night more than once needing to go to the bathroom?

The answers to these questions will enable your doctor to give you all the advice you need. So take the time to answer them properly. When it comes to getting a good night’s sleep, you need to put all the odds on your side!

DoctorNeil

Dr. Neil Stanley

Dr Neil Stanley is an independent sleep expert who has been involved in research for over 35 years. After starting out at the R.A.F. Institute of Aviation Medicine, he moved on to the University of Surrey's Human Psychopharmacology Research Unit, where he was Director of Sleep Research. Today, he travels the world lecturing on various aspects of sleep to both healthcare professionals and the public at large.